Biofeedback

Most people have used biofeedback without realizing it. Taking our weight on a scale and taking our temperature are both forms of biofeedback that provide us with information about our body.

Clients can quickly learn to regulate physiological reactions to reduce stress, worry and pain.

Clients can quickly learn to regulate physiological reactions to reduce stress, worry and pain.

Using this information we are able to choose behaviors that may change our weight if it is a problem or reduce our temperature if we have a fever.

Psychologists use sophisticated biofeedback instruments that allow clients to “see” subtle changes in physiological activity. The computerized programs act like a mirror that allows clients to understand how they react to external and internal stressors. External stressors may include pressure at work or sitting in traffic, while internal stressors are often our thoughts and perceptions of situations. When we gain an understanding of how our bodies react in subtle ways we are better equipped to change our responses that cause stress, pain, and emotional discomfort.

Clients quickly become proficient at changing responses like breathing patterns, heart rate, muscle tension, and brain wave activity. The psychologist acts like a coach, offering strategies and techniques that guide clients to better health and performance.

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Our AIR flying game is a great way to make biofeedback-training fun for clients looking to improve performance.  The instantaneous feedback of your ‘flying’ performance can add an outcome-oriented pressure similar to what is experienced in real-life stressful situations.  By understanding physiological responses to success or loss, our clients learn to manage bodily stress and to focus their mind with a calm clarity best suited for good performance.

Contact Behavior Therapy of New York to Learn more about how these approaches can help.